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December 1, 2021

Keeping Your Team Engaged!

Keeping your team engaged starts with understanding and identifying the different levels of engagement.  There are three levels of engagement: Rowers, Riders, and Resisters!

Rowers – Engaged Employees – are passionate about their work and feel very connected and loyal to the practice.  They are always looking for ways to improve performance and patient care.  They are focused on the big picture of helping the practice succeed.  They base their success on the practice’s success!

Riders – Not Engaged Employees – are essentially checked out.  They can be difficult to spot.  They are just coasting through their day by putting in time without energy or passion.  They are thinking about lunch, who just called on their cell phone, or what they are going to do when they get off work.

Resisters – Actively Disengaged Employees – are unhappy at work and demonstrate it in their words and actions.  They monopolize the doctor/manager’s time (always having to issues that need addressing), have more on-the-job accidents, create more quality concerns, are sicker and miss more days.  They undermine what their engaged coworkers accomplish and sabotage the practice.

 

 

Clear and Consistent Expectations

We start with an open and candid conversation clarifying expectations and the results desired.  Go deep enough to explain what, who, when, where, why and how.  So often time’s when delegating things are left unsaid.  Assumptions are made resulting in frustration for the doctor, the manager, and the employee!  If the employee is not clear on expectations, they cannot possibly deliver.   If you are thinking, they should just know that, or I already told them once…I don’t need to tell them again…your results will be limited!

“If you don’t ask for what you want don’t be angry when you don’t get it.” ~ Judy Kay Mausolf

 

Appropriate Equipment and Supplies

Next is making sure the team has the appropriate equipment and supplies to maximize efficiency and get better results.  It demonstrates to the employee that their work is valued because you were willing to give them the support needed to do their job.  For example, a specific instrument to aid your hygienist in safely cleaning around dental implants.  It is important to ask employees if they have what they need to be able to do their job efficiently and effectively.  The initial cost is outweighed by the ROI of increased performance, service, and productivity.

I have found men are usually much better at getting the right equipment and supplies whereas women will try to make do.  This summer my husband Steve and I went a little crazy with filling our deck with pots of flowers, succulents, and evergreens!  It became huge watering chore for me because we did not have a hose up on the deck.  I have been traveling a lot more for business…which means Steve has become the water boy!  Surprise!  I came home to find a faucet and short hose up on the deck.  Watering is now so easy it is fun!  What used to take me 1/2 hour or more now takes under 10 minutes!  We have just tripled my productivity and increased job satisfaction by having the appropriate equipment and supplies!  

  

Focusing on Strengths 

We focus on identifying and building on each team member’s strengths. This one step alone can change productivity by as much as 12.5%.  The best opportunity for people to grow and develop is to help them discover their innate talents.  It just naturally creates a feeling of wellbeing when we can do something well.  We enjoy our work more.  Focusing on a team member’s strengths is a far more effective and positive approach than constantly focusing on their weaknesses.    When employees know and use their strengths, they are more engaged, have higher performance, and are less likely to leave the practice.

Research shows that the management style of focusing on the positive strengths reduces active disengagement to 1%.  Whereas a negative focus management style produces 22% disengagement.  Surprisingly, being ignored causes the most damage at 40% disengagement!  The old saying, “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all!” is not a successful management style.  It delivers to the most negative outcome of all.

 

Which response would your employees say best reflects the management style in your practice?

  • My manager/doctor focuses on my strengths or positive characteristics.
  • My manager/doctor focuses on my weaknesses or negative characteristics.
  • My manager/doctor does not say anything at all, and I feel ignored and invisible.

Leadership teams can help engage the team by creating clear and consistent expectations, providing appropriate supplies/equipment, and focusing on strengths!

Contact Judy Kay today if you would like to learn more about how she can help you get your team ENGAGED and WORKING together to build a happier, healthier, and higher performing culture! 

November 1, 2021

How to Encourage Accountability! Part 2

Training is often a culprit of lack of accountability.  It is difficult to complete a task if we are uncertain how it is to be done.  Uncertainty lessens accountability!  Set standards for the practice by defining one way instead of multiple ways.  Standards create consistency and consistency escalates excellence.  The more consistent we are the more accountable we become resulting in a higher performing team and practice.  Provide personal training and cross training as well as entire team training to get everyone aligned on the same page.

 

 

Asking for help is being accountable.  Give your team permission to ask for help when needed.  Asking for help can often feel like a weakness when in essence it is being accountable to make sure the job gets done.  There are some team members who have OCD – Over Committers Dysfunction.  You will often here them say; “I got this!”  when they have so many plates already spinning, they can’t possibly get them all done.  Saying yes can sometimes be less accountable then delegating or asking another person for help.

Prioritize tasks as there will be days even the entire team can’t get everything done!  If we communicate and get the rocks done, we will be okay.  I utilize the rocks, pebbles, and sand analogy to help teams prioritize their responsibilities.  A rock is anything that is important and urgent (needs to be done that day) or there will be negative consequences for the practice.  The biggest rock is always the patient right in front of us.  Everyone helps everyone with their rocks (as long as it is legal, ethical and within their licensure) before going on to their own pebbles and sand.  Once all rocks are completed, the team member may move on to their pebbles.

Pebbles are also very important but not urgent.  Pebbles are never delegated because they can be done another day without affecting the practice negatively.  Everyone is responsible for their own pebbles.  A pebble can eventually become a rock if left undone based on change in urgency.  For example, ordering supplies might become a rock if you must order that day, or you will run out of necessary supplies before they arrive.  Even washing uniforms may become a rock if there are none available for the next day and it is close to closing.

Sand is the filler to fill in open time with cleaning and organizing.  Sand is also never delegated.  Everyone is responsible for their own sand.  This helps to prevent delegating the things that are less desirable.

Confirming by checking in when a task is completed is part of accountability.  It keeps everyone in the loop and ends the night wondering/worry of whether a certain task was completed.

Clearly defined consequences are necessary.  An accountable high performing team is dependent on supporting the patients, the team, and the practice standards.  Our job is whatever is legal, ethical, and within our licensure to help the team and practice thrive!   We must choose to support our patients, team, and practice if we want to be a part of the team!